The World Association of PPP Units & Professionals had the pleasure to host a dynamic collaboration workshop for Permanent Missions to the United Nations Office and other International Organizations in Geneva on 2 December 2019. Several Ambassadors and Senior Diplomats engaged in six diverse World Café sessions led by very knowledgeable hosts from all walks of life. Seven fundamental principles arose from the sessions, which should be applied by Governments when engaging in PPPs:

  1. It’s important to learn the do’s and don’ts in People first PPPs and get things right from the start. Policy matters need to be taken seriously by PPP professionals, so that projects have the right strategic aim and development objective.
  2. Institutionally, it is important to have a dedicated PPP Unit although many countries don’t have one yet.
  3. PPPs also require high quality training, since the necessary skills are found more often in the private sector than in the public sector.
  4. Risk needs should be managed in PPPs, ensuring that private sector leads are held accountable for performance and improving the overall likelihood of success. 
  5. Open competitive tenders and public procurement are instrumental, ensuring that they respond to the needs of beneficiaries. 
  6. Multilateral development banks need to listen to all stakeholders, aiming to achieve the best outcome for the most people despite differing legal and institutional frameworks..
  7. Environmental sustainability should be at the core of PPP projects.

The first of a series of webinars WAPPP and the CP3P certifier AMPG group are jointly organizing has taken place on 4 November with much success. Over 160 participants registered and dialed in from all parts of the globe. The webinar covered the broad curriculum of the CP3P certification scheme as well as a general presentation of the capacity and governance building activities of the World Association of PPP Units & Professionals.

WAPPP members benefit from a discounted rate for the CP3P certification examinations which will help expand your knowledge on PPP preparation and execution so your project is well equipped to perform. The replay of the webinar is now available on https://ppp-certification.com/events/how-build-capacity-and-governance-ppps.

Don’t wait and join wappp.org to connect with PPP professionals from around the globe to exchange in an open collaboration on your challenges and gain insight from your peers.

 3 reasons why joining the 4 November 2019 joint APMG-WAPPP webinar is important if you’re interested in improving your PPP skills.

Click here to register or copy this link to your browser https://register.gotowebinar.com/register/8817871451519367948. 

  1. Building capacity and governance in PPPs is important because it directly affects the beneficiaries of the public-private partnership. Unfortunately often the success of a PPP is compromised by poor decision taking, communication flaws and unnecessary commercial postering. It needs lots of experience and knowledge to avoid infrastructure development to go “belly up”.
  2. Meet certified PPP experts and expand your knowledge on PPP preparation and execution so your project is well equipped to perform. Learn from them how to best drive effective implementation of a PPP programme.
  3. Connect with PPP professionals from around the globe to exchange in an open format on your challenges and gain insight from your peers. 

About WAPPP:

The World Association of PPP Units & Professionals is an independent initiative to improve collaboration amongst PPP Units, Infrastructure Agencies and private sector representatives to build a global network of PPP Units and PPP professionals to make PPPs more successful and implement the United Nations 2030 Agenda Sustainable Development Goals framework to de-risk projects and improve livelihoods.

WAPPP together with SDG.17 Consulting GmbH is co-organising the international networking event „Women for Sustainable Infrastructure and People-first PPPs“ (Frankfurt am Main, 27 – 29 September, 2019).

Imagine a world where gender equality is a given, and not something that has to be fought for. What would it take to get there? Part of the process in achieving this vision is to incorporate women in the planning of infrastructure and health services – from participation of women in decision making processes, to the specific consideration of women as key users of infrastructure and the health system. People-first public private partnerships (PfPPPs) can serve as a means to work towards this necessary goal. 

High Level Inaugural PPP Conference (2019), Kampala (Uganda)

The High Level Inaugural PPP Conference (2019) was held in Serena Hotel, Kampala (Uganda) from 16-18 September with a focus on Public Private Partnerships as Africa’s next big thing. The event has been a tremendous success.

World Association of PPP Units & Professionals (WAPPP) supported the event whole heartedly. The principal organizer Ms Beatrice Florah Ikilai is WAPPP coordinator for Africa and works with Government of Uganda. She could successfully mobilize Governments, Multilateral Bodies, Corporates, Academia and International Experts from around the Globe for this event.

Transparent and Resilient PPPs

I am a strong proponent of PPPs under certain conditions which include the allocation of risk appropriately to all parties, and competitive and transparent procurements. I also believe that they should be People First PPPs, where the users have a meaningful voice in the adoption of PPP projects.

I believe in projects that are planned with transparency, sustainability and resilience as goals, where resilience implies financial, commercial and environmental resilience.

Water PPPs are Increasingly Controversial
Water PPPs (or privatization where the private sector plays a significant role) can be very controversial as access to water is considered a basic human right and is a primary concern of the Sustainable Development Goals.

Taking these fundamental rights into consideration, it is important that water PPPs, be they brownfield or greenfield projects include consultation with all stakeholders including the users who will pay for the PPP (either through water tariffs, or taxes). Water PPPs negotiations and agreements should never take place in secrecy and should address stakeholder’s interests. In addition, contractual agreements between the public and private sectors should be accessible to the general public for review and comment, albeit with certain constraints when it comes to intellectual property and competitive innovations.

Water PPPs should also be politically neutral as possible, as concessions can be up to 30 years in duration and outlive politicians who were sponsors of the projects, yet saddle communities with commitments that they have to live with for the duration of the agreement.

Gender is on Agenda: Gender mainstreaming for PfPPPs.

The achievement of gender equality and empowerment of women is at the center of the SDG Agenda: SDG.5 is specifically dedicated to gender equality. Think about it- a separate Sustainable Goal was established to underline the importance of this issue. Gender equality is also part of the concept of people-first PPPs, coined by the UNECE to bring value for people and value for climate to the PPP value chain

When we think about women representation, this is not only roughly 50 percent of population. Let's not forget about kids and elderly people, women are taking care of. The number of people affected and a value behind is much higher.

What is the problem?

Infrastructure projects typically did not take a systematic approach to gender issues, including public–private partnerships that were also often criticized for not ensuring gender equality.
Let’s take an example of healthcare infrastructure, where a gender analysis is extremely important, as women require in average more medical services than men, the pattern of sicknesses and medical needs for men and women significantly differentiate; access to healthcare is for women is sometimes more difficult, as women are mainly disadvantaged due to low income and ability to travel.
Gender equality is not only about ensuring social balance and helping socially vulnerable groups. It is also about the quality of the asset to be created and if this asset is not designed properly, it will be not used at the long-term and sustainable way.

All craftsmen have their favourite set of tools from which to practise their trade. In my case as a PPP proponent, my essential tool is the Airport Master Plan (AMP).

I originally wrote an article on the role of the AMP in PPP development for New Airport Insider (www.newairportinsider.com) in May 2016. It described an airport through its complex dynamics of turning around aircraft and processing their associated payloads. Through the logic of the AMP, I commented on operational scale and functional interdependencies at airports, and the need for the disparate elements to converge towards achieving a compelling business case to solicit private investment.

The article has continued to attract interest including positive responses from members of WAPPP. Arising from this, I am happy to extend the article to readers of The PPP Times.

Although the article is airport specific and may differ in scale and complexion to other areas of infrastructure development, I nevertheless hope readers at WAPPP may find useful parallels that may be relevant in various other ways where a PPP approach is being contemplated or initiated.

The Global Infrastructure Hub (GIH) has just released a practical guide for governments preparing for infrastructure projects based on a study that explored practices in 15 countries.  Useful case reference studies on the following countries are included in the report:  Australia, Brazil, Canada, Chile, China, India, Indonesia, Kenya, Korea, Mexico, Netherlands, Philippines, Rwanda, South Africa, and the United Kingdom. Information was gathered through literature reviews and interviews with public sector officials in the abovementioned countries.The report points out that project preparation is a challenging task for governments that wish to launch viable and feasible infrastructure projects.With this challenge in mind, the Global Infrastructure Hub (GIH) prepared this new reference tool that will be a useful aid for policy-makers and practitioners in their quest to improve project preparation practices and their capacity for preparing quality infrastructure projects.Regarding the tool, the GIH states the following - The tool seeks to help address challenges faced by governments in early-stage project preparation through providing guidance in five focus areas. The five areas include -

  • The need for enabling environments
  • Financing project preparation
  • Infrastructure planning and project prioritization
  • Project feasibility, reviews and approvals
  • Project communication